Florida Lizards

This page was last updated on
Wednesday 20 May 2020

This page serve as a photographic index of all Florida-related lizard species currently published to Floridensis. As new material is added to the website, this page will update accordingly. All lizard species are organized by their respective taxonomic families. You’ll find a small selection of images representing each species; to view all images for a particular species, click the “View all” link that accompanies each species.

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AGAMIDAE
The Agamas

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Agama picticauda

The African red-head agama

Taxonomy: Reptilia: Squamata: Sauria: Agamidae.
Native Status: Non-native to Florida. Native range is in central Africa.
Notes: Range in Florida seems to be expanding northward with isolated spottings recorded as far north and Orange and Brevard counties. Males are deep blue with orange heads. The species prefers rocky habitats, but in Florida they’ve also adapted to large, sprawling trees with lots of nooks and crannies.
View all Agama picticauda posts on Floridensis.

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DACTYLOIDAE
The Anoles

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Anolis carolinensis

The Carolina green anole

Taxonomy: Reptilia: Squamata: Sauria: Dactyloidae.
Native Status: Native to the American southeast (from Texas east to Florida and north through North Carolina). The Carolina green anole is considered to be the only native Anolis species in the United States.
Notes:  Of interest, A. carolinensis is closely related to western Cuban populations of green anoles (previously classified as Anolis porcatus). While east Cuban green anoles are still classified as A. porcatus, the western Cuban species is now identified with Anolis carolinensis. This also means there are no west-Cuban A. porcatus in South Florida (as previously believed). Instead, the South Florida A. carolinensis populations simply carry a heavier phenotypic vibe to their west Cuban brethren (a bit larger with a little more pattern, sometimes).
View all Anolis carolinensis posts on Floridensis.

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Anolis chlorocyanus

The Hispaniolan green anole

Taxonomy: Reptilia: Squamata: Sauria: Dactyloidae.
Native Status: Non-native to Florida. Native range is in Hispaniola (Haiti and Dominican Republic).
Notes: Populations in Florida seem to largely be limited (though stable) to Broward county.
View all Anolis chlorocyanus posts on Floridensis.

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Anolis cristatellus

The Puerto Rican crested anole

Taxonomy: Reptilia: Squamata: Sauria: Dactyloidae.
Native Status: Non-native to Florida. Native range is in Puerto Rico.
Notes: Populations are mostly limited to Miami-Dade county, but when established these populations can be quite dense.
View all Anolis cristatellus posts on Floridensis.

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Anolis cybotes

The Hispaniolan stout anole

Taxonomy: Reptilia: Squamata: Sauria: Dactyloidae.
Native Status: Non-native to Florida. Native range is in Hispaniola (Haiti and Dominican Republic).
Notes: Populations in Florida seem to largely be limited (though stable) to Broward county.
View all Anolis cybotes posts on Floridensis.

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Anolis 
distichus
The Bark anole

Taxonomy: Reptilia: Squamata: Sauria: Dactyloidae.
Native Status: Non-native to Florida. Native range is in Hispaniola (Haiti and Dominican Republic).
Notes: Populations in Florida are densest in Monroe county (the Florida Keys specifically) and Miami-Dade county. Isolated spottings have been recorded elsewhere in the state on a limited scale.
View all Anolis distichus posts on Floridensis.

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Anolis equestris

The Cuban knight anole

Taxonomy: Reptilia: Squamata: Sauria: Dactyloidae.
Native Status: Non-native to Florida. Native range is in Cuba.
Notes: Populations are heaviest along the southeastern coastal region (Palm Beach, Broward, and Miami-Dade counties) and the southwestern region (Lee and Collier counties). A number of isolated individuals have been recorded as far north as Volusia County.
View all Anolis equestris posts on Floridensis.

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Anolis garmani

The Jamaican giant anole

Taxonomy: Reptilia: Squamata: Sauria: Dactyloidae.
Native Status: Non-native to Florida. Native range is in Jamaica.
Notes: Isolated populations have been observed in Miami-Dade county (and potentially Broward county). This is not an easy lizard to find!
View all Anolis garmani posts on Floridensis.

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Anolis sagrei

The Cuban brown anole

Taxonomy: Reptilia: Squamata: Sauria: Dactyloidae.
Native Status: Non-native to Florida. Native range is in Cuba.
Notes: The Cuban brown anole has successfully colonized nearly the entirety of peninsular Florida. Outside of Florida, they’re been recorded as far west as California and as far north as Maine, though many of these extreme cases were likely Cuban brown anoles that arrived via shipments and cargo as opposed to established populations. Established populations, however, likely do range as far west as Texas and along the Georgia coast.
View all Anolis sagrei posts on Floridensis.

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TEIIDAE
The Whiptails & Racerunners

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Aspidoscelis sexlineatus

The Six-lined racerunner

Taxonomy: Reptilia: Squamata: Sauria: Teiidae.
Native Status: Native to Florida.
Notes: Ranges throughout most of the Florida peninsula (including the Florida Keys). outside of Florida, the range variably extends as far north as Maryland on the east coast and as far west as Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Colorado, Nebraska, and even South Dakota.
View all Aspidoscelis sexlineatus posts on Floridensis.

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CORYTOPHANIDAE
The Casquehead Lizards

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Basiliscus 
vittatus
The Brown basilisk

Taxonomy: Reptilia: Squamata: Sauria: Corytophanidae.
Native Status: Non-native to Florida. Native range runs from coastal Mexico south through much of Central America.
Notes: In Florida, established populations are heaviest along the southeastern coastal region running from around Martin County south through Miami-Dade.
View all Basiliscus vittatus posts on Floridensis.

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IGUANIDAE
The Iguanas

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Ctenosaura similis
The Black spiny-tailed iguana

Taxonomy: Reptilia: Squamata: Sauria: Iguanidae.
Native Status: Non-native to Florida. Native range runs from southern Mexico south through much of Central America.
Notes: Though not as extensively established as the Green iguana (Iguana iguana) the Black spiny-tailed iguana been recorded sporadically throughout various portions of coastal Southern Florida (east coast and west). Sarasota, Charlotte, and Lee counties on the west coast each have a number of recorded observations, as do Miami-Dade and Broward counties on the east coast.
View all Ctenosaura similis posts on Floridensis.

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Iguana iguana

The Green iguana

Taxonomy: Reptilia: Squamata: Sauria: Iguanidae.
Native Status: Non-native to Florida. Native range runs from Mexico south through  eastern South America (Brazil and Paraguay).
Notes: Widespread distribution throughout the coastal regions of Southern Florida (especially along the southeastern coast and in the Florida Keys).
View all Iguana iguana posts on Floridensis.

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LEIOCEPHALIDAE
The Curly-tailed Lizards

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Leiocephalus carinatus

The Northern curlytail lizard

Taxonomy: Reptilia: Squamata: Sauria: Leiocephalidae.
Native Status: Non-native to Florida. Native range includes Cuba, the Bahamas, and the Cayman Islands. Of interest, this species was intentionally introduced in Palm Beach county during the 1940s to combat sugar cane pests.
Notes: Widespread distribution throughout the coastal regions of the Southern Florida peninsula (from Pinellas/Hillsborough counties on the west coast south to the Keys and then back north to Volusia County on the east coast). A number of individuals have also been documented as far north as Alachua county in the interior.
View all Leiocephalus carinatus posts on Floridensis.

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ANGUIDAE
The Glass & Alligator Lizards

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Ophisaurus ventralis

The Eastern glass lizard

Taxonomy: Reptilia: Squamata: Sauria: Anguidae.
Native Status: Native to Florida.
Notes: Widespread throughout the entirety of Florida (with the exception of the Florida Keys). Outside of Florida, the Eastern glass lizard ranges as far west as Louisiana and as far north as Virginia.
View all Ophisaurus ventralis posts on Floridensis.

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PHRYNOSOMATIDAE
The Spiny Lizards

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Sceloporus undulatus

The Eastern fence lizard

Taxonomy: Reptilia: Squamata: Sauria: Phrynosomatidae.
Native Status: Native to Florida.
Notes: In Florida, the Eastern fence lizard ranges throughout Central Florida, the Florida panhandle, and the northern portion of the Florida peninsula. No individuals have been recorded south of the Okeechobee line. Outside of Florida, the Eastern fence lizard is widely distributed throughout most of the eastern United States (Mississippi north to Illinois, then east to New York and back south to Florida).
View all Sceloporus undulatus posts on Floridensis.

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Sceloporus woodi

The Florida scrub lizard

Taxonomy: Reptilia: Squamata: Sauria: Phrynosomatidae.
Native Status: Native to Florida.
Notes: In Florida, the Florida scrub lizard exists in two north-south ranges. The first is the higher, dryer interior of the state from Ocala National Forest south through to the area west of Okeechobee. The other populations exist in sandy habitats along the east-coast counties of Saint Lucie, Martin, and Palm Beach.
View all Sceloporus woodi posts on Floridensis.

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GEKKONIDAE
The Geckos

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Hemidactylus garnotii

The Garnot’s house gecko

Taxonomy: Reptilia: Squamata: Sauria: Gekkota: Gekkonidae.
Native Status: Non-native to Florida. Native range includes India the Philippines, and much of southeastern Asia, Polynesia, and even Australia.
Notes: This species primarily ranges throughout portions of central and northeast Florida (from Tampa northeast to Jacksonville), but it’s also been observed in Monroe and Miami-Dade counties in the southeast. This is a parthenogenic (meaning all individuals are female and reproduce autonomously).
View all Hemidactylus garnotti posts on Floridensis.

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Hemidactylus mabouia

The Tropical house gecko

Taxonomy: Reptilia: Squamata: Sauria: Gekkota: Gekkonidae.
Native Status: Non-native to Florida. Native range stretches throughout the eastern portions of sub-Saharan Africa.
Notes: In Florida, this species has been recorded throughout most of peninsular Florida from the Alachua-Saint Johns line south.
View all Hemidactylus mabouia posts on Floridensis.

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Hemidactylus turcicus

The Mediterranean gecko

Taxonomy: Reptilia: Squamata: Sauria: Gekkota: Gekkonidae.
Native Status: Non-native to Florida. Native range includes most of the Mediterranean region.
Notes: This species primarily ranges throughout portions of central and northeast Florida (from Tampa northeast to Jacksonville), but it’s also been observed in Monroe and Miami-Dade counties in the southeast.
View all Hemidactylus turcicus posts on Floridensis.

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SCINCIDAE
The Skinks

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Plestiodon inexpectatus

The Southeastern five-lined skink

Taxonomy: Reptilia: Squamata: Sauria: Scincidae.
Native Status: Native to Florida.
Notes: This species ranges throughout the entirety of Florida. Outside of Florida, it ranges as far west as Mississippi, north to Tennessee, east to Virginia, and back south to Florida.
View all Plestiodon inexpectatus posts on Floridensis.

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Plestiodon laticeps

The Broad-headed skink

Taxonomy: Reptilia: Squamata: Sauria: Scincidae.
Native Status: Native to Florida.
Notes: In Florida the Broad-headed skink ranges throughout Central Florida, North Florida, and the Florida panhandle; individuals are rarely observed south of Orlando. Outside of Florida, their range extends west to Texas, north through eastern Oklahoma and Kansas, east to Maryland, and then back south to Florida.
View all Plestiodon laticeps posts on Floridensis.

Plestiodon laticeps, 09 April 2013
Plestiodon laticeps, the Broad-headed skink; Lowndes county, Georgia (09 April 2013).

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Scincella lateralis

The Little brown skink

Taxonomy: Reptilia: Squamata: Sauria: Scincidae.
Native Status: Native to Florida.
Notes: In Florida, the Little brown skink ranges throughout most of the state (with only a population deficit in some of the interior portions of South Florida. Outside of Florida, their range extends west to Texas, north through Oklahoma and southeastern Kansas, east to New Jersey, and then back south to Florida.
View all Scincella lateralis posts on Floridensis.

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