Gopherus polyphemus, 22 August 2015

Gopherus polyphemus, the Gopher tortoise;
Flagler county, Florida (22 August 2015).
Learn more about this species at iNaturalist.org.

Physalia physalis, 20 May 2014

Physalia physalis, the Portuguese man o’ war;
Volusia county, Florida (20 May 2014).
Learn more about this species at iNaturalist.org.

Physalia physalis, 20 May 2014

Physalia physalis, the Portuguese man o’ war;
Volusia county, Florida (20 May 2014).
Learn more about this species at iNaturalist.org.

Porpita porpita, 20 May 2014

Porpita porpita, the Blue button;
Volusia county, Florida (20 May 2014).
Learn more about this species at iNaturalist.org.

A macro shot of the dactylozooids which radiate outward from the Blue Button’s central float structure. Despite the presence of stinging nematocysts, Porpita Porpita doesn’t pose much of a threat to people.

Porpita porpita, 20 May 2014

Porpita porpita, the Blue button;
Volusia county, Florida (20 May 2014).
Learn more about this species at iNaturalist.org.

A cluster of gonozoids (reproducitive zooids) on the underside of a BlueButton’s central float. The long, darker-bluer tentacle you see is one of the dactylozooids (which radiate outward from the disc in good ole’ fashioned tentacle style. 

Porpita porpita, 19 May 2014

Porpita porpita, the Blue button;
Volusia county, Florida (19 May 2014).
Learn more about this species at iNaturalist.org.

Not actually a jellyfish, the Blue button is better described as a colony of hydrozoan polyps functioning together as one organism. In this shot, you can see the dactylozoids radiating outward from the central float (disc). Each of those dactylozoids carries with it a series of stinging nematocysts, but the sting doesn’t pose much of a threat to people. The is a dorsal top-down view of the Blue button. 

AKtoFL: The Savage River Trail, Alaska (31 May 2011)

On the Savage River Trail
Denali Borough, Alaska (31 May 2011).
Day 01 of the 2011 Roadtrip from Alaska to Florida (Mile 0253 of 7221).

Check out the trail running to the right of the water flow. Just bumpy enough to keep your focus somewhat grounded on the path beneath your feet.