Category: The Volusia Circuit (Volusia, Flagler, Putnam, Marion, Lake, Orange, Seminole, and Brevard counties)

The Orchard Orbweaver, 07 May 2014

Leucauge venusta, the Orchard orbweaver; Flagler county, Florida (07 May 2014). Perhaps now Leucauge argyrobapta. The Orchard orbweaver, Leucauge venusta, is a fairly nifty (and utterly harmless-to-humans) arachnid traditionally listed as ranging throughout much of North, Central, and South America. In Florida, they are most certainly…

The Black-dotted Spragueia Moth, 02 June 2014

Spragueia onagrus, the Black-dotted spragueia moth; Volusia county, Florida (02 June 2014). The Black-dotted spragueia moth, Spragueia onagrus, is fairly common throughout much of the coastal region of the American southeast. A member of Family Noctuidae, the Owlet moths, this species sports a wingspan…

A Backyard Red Rat Snake, 23 September 2016

Pantherophis guttatus, the Red rat (corn) snake; Volusia county, Florida (23 September 2016). I do adore finding serpentine visitors slinking about the foliage of our backyard. I came across this smallish Corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus) scoping out the shrub line adjacent to the back…

A rowdy Garter tearing it up at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge; 31 July 2016

Thamnophis sirtalis sirtalis, the Eastern garter snake; Brevard county, Florida (31 July 2016). When it comes to punchiness and unnecessary carnage, some Garter snakes have a bit more kick than others. This individual was indeed one of the slightly-punchy garters I’ve come across in…

The Southern Ringneck Snake, 29 March 2014

Diadophis punctatus punctatus, the Southern ringneck snake; Lake county, Florida (29 March 2014). The Southern ringneck snake, Diadophis punctatus punctatus, is a small, reclusive species averaging only about a foot in length; I usually see them a bit shorter. Preying primarily upon slugs, earthworms,…

The Eastern Garter Snake, 09 April 2014

Thamnophis sirtalis sirtalis, the Eastern garter snake; Flagler county, Florida (09 April 2014). The Garter snake, Thamnophis sirtalis, is one of the most wide-ranging snake species on the North American continent. From the Atlantic to the Pacific, from the southern border to beyond the…

The Great Blue Heron, 12 January 2014

Ardea herodias, the Great blue heron; Flagler county, Florida (12 January 2014). This is a fairly typical Great blue heron, Ardea herodias, a common avian staple throughout the entirety of Florida and much of North and Central America. Fairly large and somewhat regal, the…

The Ghost Crab at Night, 22 May 2014

Ocypode quadrata, the Atlantic ghost crab; Volusia county, Florida (22 May 2014). Sometimes referred to simply as the “Sand crab,” The Atlantic ghost crab, Ocypode quadrata, shouldn’t be a stranger to coastal residents scratching out a living along the western shores of the Atlantic….

The Speckled Swimming Crab at Night, 22 May 2014

Arenaeus cribrarius, the Speckled swimming crab; Volusia county, Florida (22 May 2014). Ranging along the coasts of both the Gulf of Mexico and the western reaches of the Atlantic Ocean, the Speckled swimming crab (Arenaeus cribrarius) is a fairly nifty and surprisingly durable crab….

The Dolichos Armyworm Moth, 23 March 2014

Spodoptera dolichos, the Dolichos armyworm moth; Volusia county, Florida (23 March 2014). The Dolichos armyworm moth is a Noctuidae moth ranging from the southeastern United States south through Mexico and ultimately to Argentina in South America; that is to say, it’s an impressive and…

The Southern House Spider, 21 October 2017

Kukulcania hibernalis, the Southern house spider; Marion county, Florida (21 October 2017). I feel like I might be blowing an opportunity by posting this today because I really should post it in October, right? For Halloween? People just love spiders on Halloween. Featured here are…

The Sargassum Swimming Crab, 01 June 2014

Portunas sayi, the Sargassum swimming crab; Volusia county, Florida (01 June 2014). When people go the the beach, they tend to be somewhat blinded by the density of biodiversity surrounding them. Sure, we’ll take note of the big jellies when they wash up on…