Category: Snakes

The Peninsula Ribbon Snake, 19 January 2017

Thamnophis sauritus sackenii, the Peninsula ribbon snake; Lake county, Florida (19 January 2017). When it comes to snakes, it’s not all about the BIG ones. The little ones can be pretty cool, too. The little ones, the slim ones, the trim ones… even the…

The Burmese Python in South Florida, 03 August 2017

Python bivittatus, the Burmese python; Miami-Dade county, Florida (03 August 2017). Native to southeastern Asia, the Burmese, python, Python bivittatus, has certainly earned quite the reputation in south Florida. Though this species was recorded in Everglades National Park as far back in the 1980s,…

The Redbelly Watersnake, 05 July 2018

Nerodia erythrogaster erythrogaster, the Redbelly watersnake; Lowndes county, Georgia (05 July 2018). This past Thursday, I headed up to Lowndes county, Georgia, with my friend, Eric, to find one specific species: The Redbelly watersnake, Nerodia erythrogaster erythrogaster. Eric’s originally from the Pacific Northwest and…

The Blotched Watersnake in Oklahoma, 10 June 2004

Nerodia erythrogaster transversa, the Blotched watersnake; Cleveland county, Oklahoma (10 June 2004). Though Floridensis is mostly focused on Floridian wildlife and habitats, I’ve been fortunate enough to travel and live in various regions of North America — from the tangles of Florida all the…

The Ever-So-Tiny Brahminy Blind Snake, 28 April 2017

Indotyphlops braminus, the Brahminy blind snake; [Ramphotyphlops braminus]; Volusia county, Florida (28 April 2017). When you think of reptiles in Florida, you probably think of the big, beefy ones… rattlesnakes, cottonmouths, watersnakes, rat snakes, and, of course, the non-native pythons, iguanas, tegus, and boas…

The Florida Scarlet Snake, 18 April 2015

Cemophora coccinea coccinea, the Florida scarlet snake; Lake county, Florida (18 April 2015). Not even reaching two feet in length as a grown adult, the Florida scarlet snake, Cemophora coccinea coccinea, is a small and reclusive non-venomous snake. As is the case with the…

The Scarlet Kingsnake, 08 May 2018

Lampropeltis elapsoides,┬áthe Scarlet kingsnake, (Lampropeltis triangulum elapsoides); Volusia county, Florida (08 May 2018). The Scarlet kingsnake, Lampropeltis elapsoides, is a tri-colored, non-venomous species often confused with the venomous Coral snake (Micrurus fulvius). You’ve probably heard some variant of the rhyme before: Red on yellow,…

Spring Break 2018: A Big, Old Brown Watersnake

Nerodia taxispilota, the Brown watersnake; Collier county, Florida (15 March 2018). Series: Spring Break 2018. At last, we’ll wrap up our extended-run of Spring Break 2018 with one last Brown watersnake, Nerodia taxispilota. Watersnakes tend to show the marks of time and history on…

Spring Break 2018: The Brown Watersnake, 14 March 2018

Nerodia taxispilota, the Brown watersnake; Monroe county, Florida (14 March 2018). Series: Spring Break 2018. At long last, we’re winding down the big Spring Break 2018 series (which took much longer to work through than I’d originally anticipated), and all we have left are…

Spring Break 2018: A Hiding Brown Watersnake

Nerodia taxispilota, the Brown watersnake; Collier county, Florida (15 March 2018). Series: Spring Break 2018. Here’s another in situ Brown watersnake, Nerodia taxispilota, hiding out amongst the limestone-laden waterlines of Collier county, Florida. The random waterways, canals, and creeks of south Florida are a…

Spring Break 2018: A Very Weathered Brown Watersnake

Nerodia taxispilota, the Brown watersnake; Monroe county, Florida (15 March 2018). Series: Spring Break 2018. Featured here is a rather haggard, weathered, and worn Brown watersnake, Nerodia taxispilota, just about to shed its scales through the process of ecdysis. See that blue film over…

Spring Break 2018: Brown Watersnake in the Foliage

Nerodia taxispilota, the Brown watersnake; Monroe county, Florida (14 March 2018). Series: Spring Break 2018. Most of my snake photographs are not in situ, that is of snakes posing naturally in their natural habitats. More often than not, whenever possible at least, I catch…